How to speak so that people want to listen | Julian Treasure

How to speak so that people want to listen | Julian Treasure

Intro (00:00:00)

  • The human voice is a powerful tool, capable of both starting wars and expressing love.
  • People often feel they are not listened to when speaking.
  • Seven habits to avoid in speech: gossip, judging, negativity, complaining, excuses, exaggeration, and dogmatism.

The 7 Deadly Sins of Speaking

  • Gossip involves speaking ill of those not present and can lead to mistrust.
  • Judging others makes it difficult for them to listen to the speaker.
  • Negativity and complaining spread discomfort rather than positivity.
  • Making excuses and not taking responsibility for actions alienates listeners.
  • Embellishing the truth can escalate to lying, causing loss of credibility.
  • Dogmatism confuses opinions with facts, making the speech less persuasive.

Four Cornerstones of Powerful Speaking [HAIL]

  • Honesty involves being true and clear in what is said.
  • Authenticity means being genuine and standing in one's truth.
  • Integrity is exemplified by being consistent with one's words and actions.
  • Love (non-romantic) implies wishing well for others and enables effective communication without judgment.

What you say (00:04:16)

  • The way you say something is as important as what you say.
  • Voice is an instrument with many tools: register, timbre, prosody, pace, pitch, and volume.
  • Register affects the perceived authority; a deeper voice often sounds more authoritative.
  • Timbre relates to the feel of the voice; a warm, smooth voice is generally preferred.
  • Prosody adds meaning through intonation and rhythm.
  • Pace and silence can be used to emphasize and engage listeners.
  • Volume can both demand attention and demonstrate excitement or intimacy.
  • Sodcasting is inconsiderate broadcasting of one’s voice in public spaces.

Voice Warm-up [End of Summary]

  • Warming up the voice is crucial for important speaking events.
  • The speaker prompts the audience to stand for a voice warm-up exercise.

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