Active Recall - Summarize anything, forget nothing | Product HuntGet 40% Discount
07
Hours
09
Minutes
01
Seconds
Active Recall - Summarize anything, forget nothing | Product HuntGet 40% Discount
07
Hours
09
Minutes
01
Seconds
Active Recall - Summarize anything, forget nothing | Product HuntGet 40% Discount
07
Hours
09
Minutes
01
Seconds
Active Recall - Summarize anything, forget nothing | Product HuntGet 40% Discount
07
Hours
09
Minutes
01
Seconds
Active Recall - Summarize anything, forget nothing | Product HuntGet 40% Discount
07
Hours
09
Minutes
01
Seconds
Active Recall - Summarize anything, forget nothing | Product HuntGet 40% Discount
07
Hours
09
Minutes
01
Seconds
Active Recall - Summarize anything, forget nothing | Product HuntGet 40% Discount
07
Hours
09
Minutes
01
Seconds
Active Recall - Summarize anything, forget nothing | Product HuntGet 40% Discount
07
Hours
09
Minutes
01
Seconds
Active Recall - Summarize anything, forget nothing | Product HuntGet 40% Discount
07
Hours
09
Minutes
01
Seconds
Active Recall - Summarize anything, forget nothing | Product HuntGet 40% Discount
07
Hours
09
Minutes
01
Seconds

Dr. Mike Israetel - Build Muscle Faster than 99% of people by doing this

()
Dr. Mike Israetel - Build Muscle Faster than 99% of people by doing this

Intro (00:00:00)

  • Maximum recoverable volume (MRV) is a theoretical concept that suggests the body's ability to recover from training is finite.
  • Exceeding MRV chronically leads to losses instead of gains.
  • Overtraining can occur in any sport or activity, including ultra-running, where pushing beyond the body's recovery limits can lead to performance decline and injuries.

30% Off Your First Order AND a Free Gift Worth up to $60 (00:01:55)

  • Thrive Market is an online membership-based grocery store offering a 30% discount and a $60 free gift for new customers.
  • Thrive Market has a variety of sugar-free, high-protein, and other specialty products.
  • Dr. Mike Israetel has created his own signature products with Thrive Market, including low-carb keto truffles and nut butters sweetened with allulose.

Maximum Recoverable Volume vs Minimum Effective Volume (00:02:54)

  • Maximum recoverable volume (MRV) is the maximum amount of training volume that an individual can recover from.
  • Minimum effective volume (MEV) is the minimum amount of training volume that is required to stimulate muscle growth.
  • Training for gains should happen between the MEV and MRV.
  • The MEV and MRV can vary significantly between individuals due to factors such as muscle fiber type, genetics, and training experience.
  • A general guideline for the average person is to perform around 10 sets per week for a muscle group.
  • However, this number can be adjusted based on individual recovery capacity and training goals.
  • For example, someone with slow-twitch muscle fibers or who recovers quickly may be able to handle a higher training volume, while someone with fast-twitch muscle fibers or who recovers slowly may need to reduce their training volume.

The Maximum Amount of Sets for a Muscle Group per Week (00:05:36)

  • The maximum recoverable volume for most muscles is around 20 sets per week.
  • Exceeding this volume can lead to overreaching, overtraining, and muscle loss.
  • However, the local limit of each muscle is higher than the systemic limit.
  • Training a lot of the body's musculature very little or not at all can expose the local maximum recoverable volumes for specific muscles.
  • For many people, the local maximum recoverable volume for most muscles is around 30 to 50 sets per week.
  • Reduce upper body training volume to maintenance levels (around 5 sets per muscle group per week).
  • This will allow you to focus more training volume on your legs.
  • The local maximum recoverable volume for legs is around 30 to 50 sets per week.

How to Maximize Growth of Any Muscle (00:08:23)

  • To maximize the growth of a specific muscle, focus on increasing the volume of work sets for that muscle while reducing the volume for other muscles.
  • Start with 15 sets of quads per week and gradually increase by one or two sets per workout as recovery allows.
  • Aim for 25-40 sets per week for the target muscle for several weeks to achieve significant hypertrophy.
  • Monitor recovery and adjust volume accordingly to avoid overtraining and injuries.

Reducing Volume to Maintain (00:09:49)

  • Once a significant amount of muscle mass has been built, volume can be reduced to maintain the gains.
  • Cut typical lifting volume by a third and focus on improving running performance for a few weeks or months.
  • Gradually increase lifting volume while reducing running volume to achieve short-term gains that can be maintained.
  • Cycle between phases of more lifting and less running, and less lifting and more running, to achieve well-rounded gains.

Managing Systemic Fatigue & Recovery (00:11:37)

  • Systemic fatigue can accumulate from various sources, including cardiovascular training, weightlifting, combat sports, recreational activities, and life stressors.
  • Exceeding systemic fatigue capacity increases the risk of illness due to a weakened immune system.
  • During periods of high stress or significant work demands, it's advisable to reduce training volume to maintenance levels to avoid overtraining and potential illness.
  • Abruptly stopping and then resuming training after a prolonged break can lead to setbacks and difficulty regaining previous fitness levels.
  • Proactively adjusting training volume based on systemic fatigue capacity allows for continuous progress and avoids the need for complete training breaks.
  • Reducing training volume by a third can maintain progress without negative consequences.
  • Pushing through excessive stress can result in physical setbacks and hinder overall progress.

Finding the Range Between MVR & MEV (00:17:55)

  • Finding the range between minimum effective volume (MEV) and maximum recoverable volume (MRV) is crucial for optimizing muscle growth.
  • It's important to recognize that this range may vary significantly between individuals.
  • Efficiency in training can be advantageous, as it allows for achieving the same performance outcomes with less effort, enabling quicker progress.
  • The goal of training should be to achieve results without compromising toughness.
  • Training smart and strategically, while acknowledging limits, can help develop mental toughness without sacrificing performance.
  • Pushing oneself too hard without considering recovery can lead to injuries and hinder progress.
  • Periodization is essential for balancing training and recovery.
  • Overemphasizing "demon cleansing" (mental toughness) can disrupt periodization and negatively impact progress.
  • Finding a balance between physical training and mental well-being is crucial to avoid injuries and maintain consistency.

Overwhelmed by Endless Content?